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Discussion Forum > Dealing with new tasks in NL-FVP

I've just started using No-list FVP, after having tried Real AF and sunk under the weight of a growing backlog .

I can't remember whether I've ever tried NL-FVP in the past, but I've generally been afraid of the no-list idea. However, I'm now finding it a relief to start with a fresh to-do list every morning.

But I'm unclear about what to do when a new task, or idea for a possible task, arises during the day. Does it simply go at the end of the list and then, when the current task is completed, get compared with the new benchmark – the dotted task above the just-completed task? In other words, does the list become a catch-all list for the duration of the day?

Or does the new item get put somewhere else?

I've read many posts concerning the rules of FV, FVP, RAF, FFVP and NLFVP in the last few days, and couldn't see the answer.
March 29, 2018 at 12:27 | Unregistered CommenterChris Cooper
Clearly I've asked a question whose answer is so blazingly obvious that no-one's going to embarrass me by pointing it out.
March 30, 2018 at 15:03 | Unregistered CommenterChris Cooper
In no list systems, it is not recommended to record any incoming tasks. If you want to work on the incoming task, cross out the current task and the answer to the question "What do I want to do more than X?" will be the urgent task.
March 30, 2018 at 15:33 | Unregistered Commenterjames220
Let me clarify. A no-list "list" should only have tasks you are focusing on right now. It should not have tasks you might do or tasks you plan to do in the distant future.

Have a look at the "no-list" section of this blog:
http://markforster.squarespace.com/blog/tag/no-list
March 30, 2018 at 15:44 | Unregistered Commenterjames220
@james220

Thanks for this. A very definite reply, and it obviously describes a happy state of affairs to be aimed at. It doesn't quite settle my doubts, and I can't identify a clear statement in the article list that you link to.

An incoming task that isn't same-day urgent can obviously be dropped into my calendar, if it's time-sensitive, or into a project list if it's not. If it's same-day urgent, but I can't work on it immediately, I can set an alarm for it.

Or I can put it on a Don't Forget list, provided I develop a habit of remembering to check that during the day.

I guess these would all preserve the purity of the no-list list, which I'm really liking.


Chris
March 30, 2018 at 20:04 | Unregistered CommenterChris Cooper
Chris Cooper:

You specifically asked about No List FVP and I don't think any of the answers you've received address that specific question.

<< I'm unclear about what to do when a new task, or idea for a possible task, arises during the day. >>

The answer is "nothing". Just note it mentally and trust that it will surface in your mind when you need it.

<< Does it simply go at the end of the list and then, when the current task is completed, get compared with the new benchmark – the dotted task above the just-completed task? >>

No.

<< In other words, does the list become a catch-all list for the duration of the day? >>

No

<< Or does the new item get put somewhere else? >>

I don't advise it. The whole idea of a no-list is that that you don't have any lists of stuff hanging around. You trust your own brain to know when things need to be done. You are after all the world's greatest expert on your work. How could you not know what needs to be done?

I suggest you re-read the instructions for No List FVP.

http://markforster.squarespace.com/blog/2016/6/27/and-the-winner-is.html

http://markforster.squarespace.com/blog/2016/6/28/more-about-no-list-fvp.html

http://markforster.squarespace.com/blog/2016/6/30/the-importance-of-correct-form.html
March 30, 2018 at 21:38 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
This answer is exactly why I never could do the no-list thing. I'd be good with a "mostly no-list" system but I cannot abide things like this:

<<You trust your own brain to know when things need to be done. You are after all the world's greatest expert on your work. How could you not know what needs to be done?>>

In general, following such a system I would get most of the things I need done, but I will -- guaranteed -- forget to do something until the time to do it has passed.
March 31, 2018 at 20:29 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
Alan:

<< In general, following such a system I would get most of the things I need done, but I will -- guaranteed -- forget to do something until the time to do it has passed. >>

And you never forget to do things even though you have written them down? You're doing better than I am in that case!
April 1, 2018 at 11:38 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Thanks for the reply, Mark. I'll see how I get on with that.

I'd read those posts and others. I couldn't see this specific point stated.

Chris
April 1, 2018 at 16:39 | Unregistered CommenterChris Cooper
Oh no, I definitely fail to do things I have written also. But I guess my particular neurosis is I can't believe in an incomplete system and will quickly descend into no system rather than follow something I don't believe in. (I also don't believe no-system, but that happens without having to follow anything.)
April 1, 2018 at 19:40 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
Alan:

Maybe the best way to look at it is this:

The vast majority of humankind manage (and always have managed) to live their lives without any formal time management system at all.

A no-list system adds a degree of structure. It should therefore work at least as well as what people are doing without it and hopefully a lot better.
April 2, 2018 at 1:16 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Understood, but not satisfying. I propose a different perspective:

While there are many things that need doing, there are relatively few which are things others expect to be done in specific timely fashion. By carefully managing expectations, you can have an easily manageable set of things you must absolutely keep on top of. Then mix in all the rest of the things (which you want to keep on top of, but don't have that criticality) without losing track of the big concerns.

Following this paradigm, I could see a no-list system working quite reliably. I could also see a long-list system working quite reliably. But in both cases, there is an added element that needs to somehow be part of the operating system.
April 4, 2018 at 2:00 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
Alan Baljeu:

I used to have a saying I would repeat to myself regularly. It could do with another airing:

"Any system is better than no system, and the imperfect system you stick with is better than the perfect system you don't stick with."
April 4, 2018 at 13:33 | Registered CommenterMark Forster