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Discussion Forum > The Bounce Method - Your Experiences

Hi all!

My few posts on this forum have been about how AF1 has worked well for me. I have tried other systems, mostly Mark's but some others (Personal Kanban, Agile Results), but I have always come back to AF1 to get organized and productive again. I have just not found anything that works as well for me.

That being said, I'm trying the Bounce method now and I am liking it very much. The way that it allows you to quickly "bounce" around the list seems to have several advantages:
1. the whole list is your playground in a way that is freeing and not restrictive
2. you are able to quickly choose tasks based on priority, energy level, time available to work on it, etc.
2. when scanning the list, you end up reviewing tasks more often which enables the unconscious mind to think about whether they should be done or dismissed
3. there is no nagging feeling that there is something lurking in the list somewhere that needs to be attended to

This is how I work the list right now.
- I start each day at the end of the list, i.e. the last, most recent page. This is so I can start first on the items I write down for my daily plan, goals, etc.
- After each scan, I commit to an item with a down or up caret which indicates which direction to scan next.
- After completing the item, I draw a vertical line which converts the up/down caret to an up/down arrow. The arrow denotes a completed task.
- If I think of a task that needs to be done now, I write it at the end of the list, do it, and mark it complete with a check mark.
- Dismissal/delete - I haven't yet run into this yet. If I decide not to do an item then I'll probably just put an X next to it and move on.
- Pages with no active task are marked with an X in the corner and circled when there are no active pages before.

Perhaps after the honeymoon period is over I'll be able to report back on whether I've stuck with the Bounce method or returned to the tried-and-true AF1.

Thanks so much Mark!
February 21, 2017 at 17:37 | Unregistered CommenterJakeIsArmed
"when scanning the list, you end up reviewing tasks more often which enables the unconscious mind to think about whether they should be done or dismissed"

I've noticed this as well. It was a surprise.
February 21, 2017 at 23:13 | Unregistered CommenterDon R
It's so simple I'm not sure what to say. It just works better than anything I've tried before!
It is very important for me to be able to access recent task entries so any method that doesn't allow that is out. Bounce excels with that.
Because it is an awesome "working list" for everything, the large amount of daily type tasks starts creating a "gap" between the end of the list and earlier tasks. This makes it obvious to me of tasks which I'm putting off.

Really, I'm just happy that Mark has reminded us of this and I'm content working the list!

"When you find something that works... just go with it!"
February 22, 2017 at 6:54 | Unregistered CommenterTommy
It's quite surprising how a system so simple seems to work so well.

I'm doing this electronically. And, after a lot of head-scratching trying to figure out how to easily keep track of "up" and "down" directions without interfering with my "flow" too much, I hit upon a simple non-electronic solution.

Just grab some object on your desk (or wherever you are) that has some text on it and can be turned upside down - I'm currently using a paper-glue stick.

When my next direction is up (after the current task is worked on), I leave the glue stick on my desk on its end with the text pointing upwards (so the text on it is readable). When my next direction is down, I turn the glue stick over so the writing is upside down i.e. the direction of the text indicates my next direction.

Simple, but effective - like "The Bounce" system.
February 27, 2017 at 9:33 | Registered CommenterFrank
Unfortunately my experience with the Bounce Method was not as good as you guys. I think the reason for it is, as JakeIsArmed says, Bounce lets me play with the list. No, I don't want to play with my list, I want to be able to go through my list fast but in an ordered way. The Bounce was too slow compared to Flexible Autofocus. That could even be the reason why Mark Forster had a hard time using it before on an old, big list.

Probably because of this, what JakeIsArmed described about Bounce as "no nagging feeling that there is something lurking in the list somewhere that needs to be attended to" was absent in my use. I missed the ability to scan a whole page afforded by Flexible AF.
February 28, 2017 at 7:24 | Registered Commenternuntym
nuntym wrote ""no nagging feeling that there is something lurking in the list somewhere that needs to be attended to" was absent in my use. I missed the ability to scan a whole page"

If I have any "nagging feeling", I go through every task right to the bottom/top of the list and bounce back up/down again to the other end of the list so I've refreshed my mind about what's on the list - and then choose the thing I most want to do. Can't see anything in the rules that would prevent you doing that. Any task can be accessed at any time.

After a short test on a smaller list, I (perhaps foolishly) dumped 503 tasks/projects on my Bounce list a couple of days ago, partly to see what would happen. Still seems to be working fine :-)
February 28, 2017 at 8:08 | Registered CommenterFrank
nuntym and Frank:

There is of course an even simpler method of dealing with that nagging feeling, which is just to read quickly through the list from beginning to end. I have in the past recommended that at the start of each day whatever system one is using. But of course it can be done at any time you feel it necessary.
February 28, 2017 at 10:27 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
nuntym:

I was also drawn back to Flexible Autofocus (with an instant jump to the end for urgent items, then wrapping back around the list). Page by page felt more ordered, as you said. I kind of missed it!

For the past few days though I've been using Activefocus (No-List Autofocus) and had been considering trying Jefferson Nickel again, either on its own or with Flexible Autofocus as the base.
February 28, 2017 at 13:29 | Registered CommenterMichael B.