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Discussion Forum > 90 days of Real AutoFocus

After three months, I'm still going strong with RealAF.*

Recently, I've added a fourth 'D' for Delay, to the 'DDD' (Delete Defer Do) step. Occasionally, I end up with ten or more tasks above the line, and really want to take action on some of them later today. It feels too awkward to force myself to take some minimal action on such a task merely to enable a rewrite at the end of the list. I don't want to delete it, or defer it to tomorrow or later. And I really don't want to avoid cycling the list after the first pass just to avoid taking the DDD step early in the day. So in this circumstance, I give myself permission to reenter immediately and cross off that task. In my DDDD processing, I use distinct marks in the space between the dot • and the first word in the task description: X for delete, > for defer, V for delay.

Is anybody else sticking with RealAF, according to the original rules or with minimal modifications?

________________
* I won't abbreviate it as "RAF" because I remember both 'Reverse' and 'Revised' AutoFocus variants, and don't want to confuse the newer 'Real' method with those.
November 1, 2017 at 19:44 | Registered Commenterubi
I'm evolving my own unique approach to activities inspired by RAF but diverging wildly from that. At the moment it seems most like AF4R with a no-list flair to it. (AF4R was the system that took AF4's old and new lists and added Recurring and Unfinished pages all mixed in.)

Which doesn't sound very much like RAF at all does it? Still, it was my starting point. And then I got inspiration from Simple Scanning reimagined and the Checklist system. And some books. (But I promise I the end it will all be extremely simple:)
November 1, 2017 at 22:58 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
ubi:

<< I won't abbreviate it as "RAF" because I remember both 'Reverse' and 'Revised' AutoFocus variants, and don't want to confuse the newer 'Real' method with those. >>

In fact, being an Army man, I'd always intended it to be abbreviated RA in honour of the Royal Artillery, but unfortunately RAF caught on before I'd announced that..
November 2, 2017 at 1:15 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Mark,

Haha. Well it's your blog, and you invented the system, so I'll abbreviate it RA (for Real Autofocus with lowercase 'f') from now on! We're not the Royal Air Force, after all. ;-)
November 2, 2017 at 1:28 | Registered Commenterubi
ubi:

Ubique
November 2, 2017 at 8:11 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
I have been using RA since day one.

Someone said in another thread that all Mark's systems help one learn something new, so when one moves on to another system (or back to a previous) one one starts afresh and with new skills. In other words, the new/old system works better thanks to the training acquired.

I don't think I would take advantage of RA straight away without having gone through AF, the no-list, etc over the years. But I now have a soft spot for RA because it has allowed me the peace of mind to finally get some *real good habits*. And by that I mean finally working calmly and *little and often* like never before, and feeling good about all my commitments as new professor (teaching, research and service). 3.5 years in the job and I finally have time to do research, even if for only 10 minutes, every working day. :)

Also, I have been asking myself "How good do I feel?" and noting down the answer. As Mark suggested, I don't hunt over my stats and or force myself to feel better. The mark has been steadily increasing, and I think I have been smiling more often.

Thank you, Mark! And thank you all for keeping many ideas kicking around here.
November 2, 2017 at 20:03 | Unregistered CommenterNatalia
Natalia:

<< Someone said in another thread that all Mark's systems help one learn something new, so when one moves on to another system (or back to a previous) one one starts afresh and with new skills. In other words, the new/old system works better thanks to the training acquired. >>

Yes, I think that's true, even (or perhaps especially) for me. As I said today to Alan Baljeu in another thread, when I look at the list of tasks in GED that I did 18 years ago I realise that I could do tons more nowadays,
November 3, 2017 at 13:54 | Registered CommenterMark Forster