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FV and FVP Forum > Newbie: FV vs. FVP

Hello!

I just stumbled upon this recently and am very interested in using this system! :)

I think I'm understanding the basic system well, but am getting a little confused because I see that there were various changes made as it was developed.

So, is this video (which I found very helpful) FV or FVP?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3Qauv4kgR8

I also found this, which is FV, but am wondering if you can explain (or link me to an explanation) how FVP works? http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs004/1100358239599/archive/1109511856508.html

I want to try this out, but would like to choose just one way to try it so I can give it a fair shake and not be tweaking (a habit I'm trying to break!) the whole time.

Thank you!
Elisabeth
October 19, 2015 at 18:08 | Unregistered CommenterElisabeth
Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but the video looks like FV. The newer, "final version perfected" (FVP) is basically an adjustment to the Final Version, particularly in the way tasks are preselected once you get going. Instructions on FVP are over on the blog, scroll down to May 15th for the complete instructions for FVP. I believe you can access it through this link:

http://markforster.squarespace.com/blog/2015/5/21/the-final-version-perfected-fvp.html

Hope that helps! On a personal note, this is an amazing system.
October 19, 2015 at 20:07 | Unregistered CommenterPaul MacNeil
Thank you, Paul! That explanation is really helpful.

Does anyone have an opinion about which way is best for a newbie to start with? It seems that the FVP version maybe has a bit more scanning in between doing the tasks you have marked, right?
October 19, 2015 at 20:37 | Unregistered CommenterElisabeth
Elisabeth:

Thanks for flagging up Sarah Michele Ford's video, which I hadn't seen before. She does make it really clear. And yes it is FV which she is describing.

The difference between FV and FVP is that the FV "ladder" only contains a selection of tasks before the first active task on the list. In other words, you are only doing *some* of the tasks which would be better done before the first task.

FVP on the other hand puts *all* the tasks in the right order. Yes, this does involve a bit more scanning, though probably not as much as you would think. It is very easy to do, and very responsive to changes in circumstances.

The various changes in FVP have only been in the question asked. My current favourite is to ask the same question as in FV, i.e. "What do I want to do before... ?"

My advice would be to start with FVP. It's easier to do (because FV has a tendency to increase resistance to the tasks after a while), it's more comprehensive and it's more responsive to changes in urgency. Nevertheless FV is still an excellent system.
October 19, 2015 at 21:29 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Hello, Mark!

Thank you so much for your detailed response to my question! Yes, I found Sarah Michele Ford's video to be very helpful to help me understand FV.

Thank you for helping me understand the difference between FV and FVP. I did try FVP today with a short list (about 14 items) and really, really was impressed with how much work I got done and how intuitive it is to use.

Something you wrote on this website was helpful for me. That FVP is designed for tasks you do with discretionary time. I think I've been hoping to find a "system" that will manage everything ... routine/daily type tasks, project management, reference, etc. Your comment that FVP is like one tool in the toolbox is very helpful. Now I just have to figure out which other tools to use!

For instance, I'm wondering if you can assist me with what to do with the (myriad!) of ideas that come to mind every day. They are not usually immediately implementable, but are not things I'm willing to just let go.

Also, I'm finding managing the multitude of projects that are my responsibility well (keeping track of everything that has to be done, figuring out which project to do next, being sure I'll remember a project that's needed in the future, etc.). Any suggestions for me? I just discovered that you are also an author! If I was going to start with one of your books, which one would you recommend?

Thank you!
Elisabeth
October 19, 2015 at 22:25 | Unregistered CommenterElisabeth
Elisabeth:

<< Thank you for helping me understand the difference between FV and FVP. I did try FVP today with a short list (about 14 items) and really, really was impressed with how much work I got done and how intuitive it is to use. >>

Yes, it's very easy. I'm currently using it on a list of 166 items and it is putting them beautifully in order!

<< Something you wrote on this website was helpful for me. That FVP is designed for tasks you do with discretionary time. >>

Discretionary time is basically what fills the "white space" in your schedule. Non-discretionary time is the appointments you have written in. So discretionary time covers just about everything except meetings and the like.

<< I think I've been hoping to find a "system" that will manage everything ... routine/daily type tasks, project management, reference, etc. >>

I think it's best to use specialized tools for things like project management and reference. FVP will work with any of them. The trouble with having a multi-purpose system is that you can't use the best available for each of the various aspects.

<< Your comment that FVP is like one tool in the toolbox is very helpful. Now I just have to figure out which other tools to use! >>

Personally I use Evernote for most things.

<< For instance, I'm wondering if you can assist me with what to do with the (myriad!) of ideas that come to mind every day. They are not usually immediately implementable, but are not things I'm willing to just let go. >>

Put them straight into FVP. I usually put a query after them, e.g. Invent time machine?, which indicates that further research and thought is necessary. You can then break it down into smaller tasks which also go in FVP. Since FVP puts everything into the best order, you won't come to them until you are ready to.

<< Also, I'm finding managing the multitude of projects that are my responsibility well (keeping track of everything that has to be done, figuring out which project to do next, being sure I'll remember a project that's needed in the future, etc.). >>

You can put projects as well as tasks into FVP.

<< Any suggestions for me? I just discovered that you are also an author! If I was going to start with one of your books, which one would you recommend? >>

I would suggest my latest one The Secrets of Productive People. I developed FVP after I wrote the book so you may prefer it to the system I mention in the book. The book is about productivity rather than time management so 99% of the book applies whatever time management system you use.
October 19, 2015 at 23:29 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Mark,

Thank you so much. I started reading The Secrets of Productive People last night and it's excellent!

I will try putting my projects and my ideas into FVP. I think it will work well for me.

As far as discretionary time, as a teacher and mother, I feel like I don't have very much of that, but I will seek to use FVP to maximize the time that I do have.

When I'm seeking something to use for my project notes and files, I will definitely consider Evernote. I have used it in the past some. I love how you can put anything in it, even photos. But I've found it to be a little slow. I'm using SimpleNote right now, which is very fast and clean. You can only enter text however, so it limits what I can save.

Well, thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. After I've been using FVP for a while, I will plan to let you know how it is going. Now my biggest challenge is to not put too many tasks into the system all at once and overload it!

Gratefully,
Elisabeth
October 20, 2015 at 11:31 | Unregistered CommenterElisabeth
I have some more questions after using FVP for a few days. (And I've really gotten so much done with this system!)

1. I think based on what I've read here that I should not just move the three remaining tasks on my first page to the end of the list if I've not worked on them. Am I right? And if so, I'm curious as to why.

2. I'm seeing lots of different questions that people use, as well as a "no question" version. Do you think it's a good idea to just use "What do I want to do before X?" as my question, or is there a compelling reason to do anther one, or no question at all?

Thank you!
October 21, 2015 at 19:13 | Unregistered CommenterElisabeth
Elisabeth:

<< I think based on what I've read here that I should not just move the three remaining tasks on my first page to the end of the list if I've not worked on them. >>

In theory it shouldn't make any difference where in the list a particular task is. That's because FVP uses a sorting algorithm to put things in the right order. In practice it's probably not quite as simple as that!

There's nothing to stop you moving a task or tasks to the end of the list if you want to.

<< I'm seeing lots of different questions that people use, as well as a "no question" version. Do you think it's a good idea to just use "What do I want to do before X?" as my question, or is there a compelling reason to do anther one, or no question at all? >>

As I said, FVP uses a sorting algorithm, which sorts tasks in whatever order you decide. If your question was "What is more difficult than x?", you'd get the tasks in descending order of difficulty. If your question was "What is easier than x?" you'd get the tasks in ascending order of difficulty. So the question is very important, but it needs to fit what you want. "What do I want to do before x?" is a good way of getting at what you want and I suggest you start there. But once you've got a bit of experience, you might want to experiment with other questions.
October 21, 2015 at 19:31 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Perfect. Thank you, Mark!

I have to mention that I love the simplicity of this. I'd been trying to maintain several different lists based on context, different project & task lists, etc. It was just so much work to maintain. I think FVP is the apex of simplicity and effectiveness.

Thank you so much for sharing it with the world.

Gratefully,
Elisabeth
October 21, 2015 at 19:59 | Unregistered CommenterElisabeth
"What needs to be done before x?" (with the stress on "needs") is also a good basic question.
October 23, 2015 at 11:40 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
I just work with the stupidest question I could come up with: "What am I going to do before X?"
October 24, 2015 at 9:01 | Unregistered CommenterChristopher
---"What needs to be done before x?" (with the stress on "needs") is also a good basic question."

That sounds like a great question, Mark. I'll try that!
October 24, 2015 at 10:52 | Unregistered CommenterElisabeth