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FV and FVP Forum > The Current "No (Carried Forward) List" Systems

5T (Variation 1)

"Here's a simple variation on the 5T method in "The Secrets of Productive People". I haven't been using it long so it's too early to report back on it in detail, but it seems to be a flexible and easy-to-use "no list" system. I'm describing it here in case anyone else would like to have a go at it.

1. Write a list of 5 tasks.
2. Do the tasks in any order.
3. Do not add or re-enter any tasks to the list until you have only one task left.
4. When you have only one task left, add four further tasks to the list.
5. Earlier tasks may be re-entered at this stage, but count towards the four."

http://markforster.squarespace.com/fv-forum/post/2550548
December 16, 2015 at 9:14 | Registered CommenterMichael B.
"No List" FVP

"Here's how "No List" FVP works:

1. Write down a task you want to do.
2. Ask yourself "Is there anything I want to do first?"
3. Write that down on the next line.
4. Repeat the process until you get no answer to the question.
5. Do the end task on the list.
6. Before you do the next task (i.e. the last active task remaining on the list), ask the question again and repeat as above until you get no answer to the question.
7. Continue this process until there are no active tasks left on the list. Write down another task you want to do and start the whole process again.

Repeat ad infinitum.

POINTS TO NOTE

1) It's perfectly ok for there to be no answer to the question when you've written down the first task. In this case just do the first task and then write down another one. If this results in writing down tasks one by one and doing them immediately, that's fine.

2) You can build up to a difficult task by entering it as the first task and then gradually working back to it. This is quite an effective technique for getting moving on something. When deciding what to write as your new first task, it's a good thing (though not compulsory) to select relatively difficult and/or important tasks. The more trivial tasks will get done as "fillers".

3) It's good to end the working day with no tasks remaining on your list. So try and select the tasks you write down towards the end of the day with this in mind.

A good method with "No List" FVP is to start the list initially with the three or four major tasks/projects that you want to take action on during the day. You need to make sure that they are in the reverse order to that in which you want to do them.

Doing this gives a lot of focus to the day. It ensures that the major projects get done, while routine stuff fits into the gaps between them."

http://markforster.squarespace.com/fv-forum/post/2523093
December 16, 2015 at 9:19 | Registered CommenterMichael B.
"One Day" FVP

1. Work FVP as normal (with or without a question according to preference).
2. Aim to action every item on the list by the end of the day.
3. Construct the list afresh each day.

Since the aim is to do the lot, it is best not to make the list too long, especially as you can always add tasks during the day."

http://markforster.squarespace.com/fv-forum/post/2523093
December 16, 2015 at 9:31 | Registered CommenterMichael B.
SMEMA

1. Write down three tasks.
2. Do two (in order).
3. Add two (so there are three tasks again).
4. Repeat from step 2 (do two, add two) ad infinitum.

Note: This system is not fed by other lists. It relies only on what's in your mind at the time this list is made.
December 16, 2015 at 9:41 | Registered CommenterMichael B.
3T

1. Write down three tasks.
2. Work on the tasks in any order, in rotation, until two are finished for now.
3. Add two (so there are three tasks again).
4. Repeat from step 2 (*finish* two, add two) ad infinitum.

Note: This system may be fed by other lists.
December 16, 2015 at 9:50 | Registered CommenterMichael B.
Another Little Method

"Here's another little method I'm experimenting with:

1. Write down as many tasks as you want—but they must be done in the order they are written.
2. You can add and re-enter tasks at any time.
3. You can reschedule by crossing tasks out.
4. Experiencing resistance to the list should always be taken as a sign that rescheduling is needed.

The idea of this is to have a short list which takes you up to the next time horizon. What that is is up to you to decide. I am trying to keep my list quite short (currently 9 tasks including writing this). But there is no set length—and it will vary quite a bit."

http://markforster.squarespace.com/forum/post/2550490
December 22, 2015 at 3:48 | Registered CommenterMichael B.
Another Little Method (Variation 1)

1. Write down as many tasks as you want—but only enough to take you up to your next time horizon.
2. Work on them in any order.
3. You can add, delete and re-enter tasks at any time.
4. If you experience resistance to the list delete any tasks which you think might be causing the resistance.

http://markforster.squarespace.com/forum/post/2550490
December 22, 2015 at 3:51 | Registered CommenterMichael B.