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FV and FVP Forum > FVP Experiences

I've received the following email which I think might be of interest to others as well. I'm copying it with the permission of the writer [Glyn].

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Hi Mark,

I've been a long-time user of your time management systems, and semi-regular visitor (though not commentor) to your site, so I thought I'd drop you a line to say thanks, and (in case it's of interest) to give some feedback on how I personally use FVP.

I originally came to an early version of AutoFocus (AF1 maybe?) a few years ago via a post on (I think) LifeHacker. I used it for a while, but didn't really get on with it, and drifed away to other task-list management approaches. When I saw that you'd developed a new version with only the open and closed lists that felt like a big improvement, so I tried it again (AF4 I think), liked it, and used it on-and-off for several years, trying other systems along the way, but always coming back to it.

On first reading your post about FV I wasn't entirely convinced, but out of curiosity put an entry to try it on my AF list (it's great that your systems can work off the same paper list, so trying a newer system is so easy). There it languished for a while, but about a month ago I had traversed my closed list without doing anything and was faced with the choice of either doing or ditching "Try Mark Forster's FV system". Happily I chose to try it (by then in FVP form), and have found it more effective, more fun and easier to stick to than any other time management approach I've tried!

A couple of small variations I have made, based on the best features of AF: I have been using it 'questionless' from about week in, as I preferred the effortless way tasks that are 'ready' to be done simply pop-out in AF. Also I use dotting the first item as a cue for reviewing and pruning: before I dot it, I ask myself how it came to be on the list for long enough to get to the top. What was the source of resistance that led to it not already having been done? Should it be removed, postponed or actioned? Then I keep my dotted lists short, and at least every couple of days I try to clear the dotted list entirely, so that older tasks are always being actioned (or otherwise cleared out).

Seems to work well for me. :)

Anyway, thank you for your hard work in making productivity easy and fun. Keep up the good work!

Best Wishes for a successful 2016,

Glyn
January 7, 2016 at 11:30 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
@ Glyn

> I keep my dotted lists short, and at least every couple of days I try to clear the dotted list entirely, so that older tasks are always being actioned (or otherwise cleared out).

You might like to try reverse FVP < http://markforster.squarespace.com/fv-forum/post/2563635 >. Because it involves scanning "backwards" (up the list from newer to older), older tasks are always being reviewed, and actioned appropriately.
January 8, 2016 at 8:05 | Unregistered CommenterChris Cooper