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FV and FVP Forum > Fast FVP

http://markforster.squarespace.com/blog/2016/12/21/fast-fvp.html

Basically FVP but anytime you make a dot, you can choose to do that dotted task immediately instead of continuing to dot until the end.

Anybody running with it? Any reports? I'm trying it now.

One detail I don't think Mark included is going back. Perhaps it also sometimes makes sense to do the previously dotted task next rather than continue dotting down. Thought?
January 5, 2017 at 15:49 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
Alan:

<< One detail I don't think Mark included is going back. Perhaps it also sometimes makes sense to do the previously dotted task next rather than continue dotting down.>>

Well I did include it because I said the selection is done exactly as it's done in FVP, and that _is_ exactly how it's done in FVP.
January 5, 2017 at 16:11 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Alan Baljeu:

I've tried Fast FVP and think it's a great improvement. It was slightly similar to how I'd been randomly using FVP at times: While dotting tasks after multiple passes through the list, I would occasionally think "There isn't likely to be anything further down the list that I want to do before this". Then I would just do the task without continuing my scan. It wasn't systematic and was more of an occasional urgent impulse.
January 5, 2017 at 16:17 | Registered CommenterMichael B.
I think I am misunderstanding something about Fast FVP, because the way I’m doing it, it seems to be susceptible to “getting stuck” very frequently.

An example of what I mean:

1. The first item on the list is ‘overhaul filing system’. I’m not ready to do this, so I ask if there’s something I want to do more.
2. I scan down and the first item I want to do more is to call my sister. I really love talking to my sister, but it’s the middle of the night where she lives. So I’m not ready to do this, either. I dot it and scan downwards, asking if there’s anything I want to do more.
3. There isn’t. Nothing on my list right now is preferable to catching up with my sister.

… What now? it seems like the algorithm has got stuck and that I cannot proceed. (Of course, I can use my common sense and do something else, but then I’m not using the algorithm.) This example implies a very short list, but I find the same thing happening at the end of a longer list: a task I’m not ready to do, and no tasks in the relevant area of the list that I’d rather do more.

I would be grateful for any clarification!

Thanks for all your work, Mark.
January 16, 2017 at 19:36 | Unregistered CommenterJeff
"What do I want to do more?" should be asked in the context of what you can actually do now. You should never select something you can't do at all.
January 16, 2017 at 20:56 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
Ah, interesting – I thought this aspect of "doable" was included in the "ready?" part of the question. Thanks.
January 16, 2017 at 22:51 | Unregistered CommenterJeff
Jeff:

I've encountered similar situations to you. I don't use the question "What do I want to do more than X?". There's lots of things I may want to do more than X, but fewer I want to do right now before X that make sense. So I use any question that implies "What makes sense to do right now before X?". I've had good success with "But first...", "But right now..., and using FastFVP, "Ready?", or "Now?" combined with the standing out principle, or "First...".
January 17, 2017 at 1:12 | Registered CommenterMichael B.