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FV and FVP Forum > DIT with FVP Override

I had a brainstorm for a new system that dynamically changes between DIT and FVP (or Fast FVP) depending on the circumstances.

I don't intend to test or use this system right now, since I'm more engaged with my DIT/TOC method, and we're currently going through the Lenten Challenge ( http://markforster.squarespace.com/blog/2017/2/23/what-to-give-up-for-lent.html )

But I wanted to write it out while it was fresh in my mind. This idea was sparked by some of the Progress Report discussion for the Lenten Challenge ( http://markforster.squarespace.com/blog/2017/3/3/report-on-progress.html ).

Start with DIT. Work as normal unless you get behind (defined in the usual way as unfinished tasks lingering for 3 days or more). You are presumably behind because of some kind of emergency or unusual situation. (Perhaps the emergency is that you are chronically overcommitted?)

If you get behind, then switch to FVP (or Fast-FVP if you prefer):
1. Stop the DIT cadence of current initiative followed by the daily tasks and task diary. Your current initiative is "the emergency", and you should focus most of your time on it, using FVP.
2. Treat the existing pages of tasks as your FVP list. Dot the first unfinished task and work as usual according to FVP rules. Enter new tasks as per normal FVP rules, i.e., at the end of the list. If you are using a dated journal, don't pay attention to the dates on the page.

Switch back to DIT when the situation has normalized. How to tell if the situation has normalized? At the end of the day, check what pages you worked on. Were you always working in the last two pages of the list? Then you are probably still in emergency mode. Carry on with FVP. But if you've started to work in earlier pages of your FVP list, you should consider going back to DIT:
1. Starting tomorrow, go back to the normal DIT practice of working on your current initiative as your first order of business. If you balk at this because you still feel the time pressure of the emergency, you can carry on with FVP. But it's probably good to pause and ask yourself whether that's really necessary.
2. Use your current initiative time to do the following:
- Review your old "daily tasks" list, and bring it up-to-date if needed.
- Declare a backlog as follows.
- Draw a heavy line at the end of yesterday's page. Review all the unfinished tasks in your list from before today. Highlight things you need to do to wrap up the emergency and re-establish normalcy. Highlight also the most pressing things that have been neglected during the emergency. All these highlighted items are your backlog. Ignore all the other old unfinished tasks in your task diary (i.e. everything else before the heavy line).
- Set aside your backlogged email in a separate backlog folder. Same with paper.
- Clearing this backlog of emails, paper, and highlighted items is your current initiative until it's done.
3. Go back to the normal DIT routines: start the day with your current initiative; work your daily tasks and task diary; enter new tasks on tomorrow's page, etc.
March 5, 2017 at 1:27 | Registered CommenterSeraphim