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Discussion Forum > Promised AF4 Revision

Quite a long time ago I said that I was working on a revision of AF4. Since then I have been working away on it, and here it is. It's turned out to be very different from AF4, but has incorporated many of the things we have been recently discussing on the Forum. I have been finding the grouping of tasks into New, Old, Recurring and Unfinished extremely powerful.

Here's how it's done:

• It's best to use a lined notebook. The size of the page and the number of lines doesn't matter too much. (I'm assuming in these instructions that you will be using paper and pen, but it's easy to duplicate electronically)

• Start by heading three successive pages of your notebook "New", "Recurring" and "Unfinished" respectively.

• Then on the first page write down about 10-20 tasks that you need to do, and draw a line under them. These are your initial "Old Tasks". As you think of other tasks or they arise in the course of your work, add them below the line. These are your "New Tasks".

• Go through all the "Old Tasks" in order. Whenever a tasks feels ready to be done, work on it.

• If you finish the task completely, cross it off the list. If it's a recurring task, re-enter it on the "Recurring" page. If you haven't finished the task, re-enter it on the "Unfinished" page.

• At this stage you only work on the Old Tasks, ignoring the others. Continue circulating through the Old Tasks until no more of them feel ready to be done for the moment. Now start working on the New Tasks (which are the ones below the line, remember).

• When you've done as much work as you want to do on New Tasks for the time being, deal with the "Recurring" page and then the "Unfinished" page in the same way - except that there is no line dividing these pages. Once you have done all the tasks you want to do on the Unfinished page, return to the Old Tasks. You must do at least one task (hopefully more), otherwise all remaining Old Tasks are dismissed. Please note that only Old Tasks are liable to be dismissed. New Tasks, Recurring Tasks and Unfinished Tasks are not dismissed.

• Once all the Old Tasks have been done or dismissed, a new line is drawn and the existing New Tasks are re-designated as Old Tasks.

• Any time you fill a page with tasks, continue the same heading onto a new page. Then when you are working on each particular type of task circulate through all the pages with that heading.
December 3, 2010 at 8:37 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Good morning Mark!

Thanks for offering us up a new system to work with.

My initial feeling is that I like the look of this.

Specifically, I like the grouping into 3 page types (I'm sure Gerry would approve too!)

I often start new projects and regularly do not finish them (at home anyway). Hopefully writing new tasks on the respective page will help me stay aware of new tasks I am taking on.

One question: Are you putting review / waiting for type items onto the 'unfinished' pages. My guess is that it would be similar to autofocus. I.e. put it on the unfinished page if it's due within a few days or write a calender review date if it's several weeks away. Is this so?
December 3, 2010 at 9:59 | Registered Commenterleon
Hello Mark,

Just a couple of things after a quick read through:

<When you've done as much work as you want to do on New Tasks for the time being, deal with the "Recurring" page and then the "Unfinished" page in the same way - except that there is no line dividing these pages. Once you have done all the tasks you want to do on the Unfinished page, return to the Old Tasks. You must do at least one task (hopefully more), otherwise all remaining Old Tasks are dismissed. Please note that only Old Tasks are liable to be dismissed. New Tasks and the tasks in Columns 2 and 3 are not dismissed.>

Are not the 'Columns' actually the Recurring and Unfinished Pages?

I haven't yet tried this new approach and may not do so until I've been running my DWM2 notebook for a bit and read other reactions/feedback. I wonder if the three page types might not get mixed up and 'interfere' with the processing in that one will be paging through other page types looking for the next location of the type one is working on.

Maybe a notebook with moveable pages would be more suitable so that the New (with its Old tasks), Unfinished and Recurring tasks remain with each other.
December 3, 2010 at 10:02 | Registered CommenterRoger J
Thanks, Mark.

I rather fear that by the time I've given SAF a proper go, this will be ancient history.
December 3, 2010 at 10:26 | Registered CommenterWill
Hi Mark,

On reviewing DWM2 and Roger's thoughts, do you consider DWM2 as being a more elgant system than revised AF4? What, in your experience, are the relative strengths & weaknesses with your revised AF4 System compared with your other systems?
December 3, 2010 at 11:01 | Registered Commenterleon
Thanks, Mark. I'm going to jump right in and try it now.
First task is "Separate current DWM2 list into Revised AF4 categories".
Best wishes.
December 3, 2010 at 11:54 | Registered CommenterMargaret1
I like these new ideas for AF. I just rebooted my AF list using some of Alan's ideas about separate project lists and am going through it using a post-it note to collect tasks when several attack my brain at once (a little like SAF and someone's (I don't recall who) separate moving page idea).

Pulling things out into projects and leaving a note about the project and/or top tasks on the AF list is helping keep me more organized. I think that pulling out recurring tasks will do the same.

Thanks for all the ideas!
December 3, 2010 at 13:30 | Registered CommenterJessica O
Sounds like how My System once worked. It also had an AF4 list and separated out the unfinished tasks, and it worked well.

A big difference is that you never dismiss Unfinished tasks or Recurring tasks. This surprises me. Where then is the push to clear Unfinished tasks?
December 3, 2010 at 13:32 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
leon:

<< Are you putting review / waiting for type items onto the 'unfinished' pages. My guess is that it would be similar to autofocus. I.e. put it on the unfinished page if it's due within a few days or write a calender review date if it's several weeks away. Is this so? >>

That sort of task I usually put under New Tasks because I have finished everything I can do on the subject for the time being. The review is intended to check whether further action is possible/needed.

Yes, if it's more than a few days away put it in some form of reminder, rather than on the list.
December 3, 2010 at 13:54 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Roger J:

<< Are not the 'Columns' actually the Recurring and Unfinished Pages? >>

Oops, yes, that's a left over from an earlier draft which I have failed to amend. I will change it.
December 3, 2010 at 13:56 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Roger J:

<< I wonder if the three page types might not get mixed up and 'interfere' with the processing in that one will be paging through other page types looking for the next location of the type one is working on. >>

It's not proved too much of a problem for me. I certainly prefer it to having separate columns which I tried at an earlier stage.
December 3, 2010 at 13:58 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Roger J:

<< Maybe a notebook with moveable pages would be more suitable so that the New (with its Old tasks), Unfinished and Recurring tasks remain with each other. >>

Yes, I'm sure that would be an excellent solution. Personally I don't like notebooks with moveable pages, but that doesn't stop anyone else from trying it.
December 3, 2010 at 14:00 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Leon:

<< On reviewing DWM2 and Roger's thoughts, do you consider DWM2 as being a more elgant system than revised AF4? What, in your experience, are the relative strengths & weaknesses with your revised AF4 System compared with your other systems? >>

I don't know that elegant is the right word. Having three different types of page and four different categories of task is not very elegant, but I think the advantages outweigh the disadvantages.

The main advantages are that it makes it much easier to see where you are getting stuck and why, and gives you a greatly improved sense of how your work is progressing. If you find yourself getting bogged down in loads of trivial tasks, then you can slash the number of recurring tasks you have. If you have too many unfinished tasks, then you need to look at the number of time-consuming commitments you have made.

I also find that having Recurring and Unfinished tasks grouped helps me to deal with them more effectively.

Another effect is that the number of New Tasks is drastically reduced. This speeds up the AF4 process.
December 3, 2010 at 14:07 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Margaret:

<< First task is "Separate current DWM2 list into Revised AF4 categories".>>

Actually the first step is to enter all tasks into New Tasks. They only get categorised once they have had some action taken on them.
December 3, 2010 at 14:10 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Alan:

<< Where then is the push to clear Unfinished tasks? >>

Just the fact that they are Unfinished.
December 3, 2010 at 14:11 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Earlier you wrote that your new version of AF4 would be happier with larger-grained tasks than some other systems. Is that the case here?
December 3, 2010 at 14:17 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
I'm giving it a shot... It was trivial to set up four folders on Toodledo to manage each of the headings. We'll see how it goes... I really love the timed dismissal of DWM so going back to something without it may be interesting.
December 3, 2010 at 15:59 | Registered CommenterSarah
Mark, Alan and the rest:

<A big difference is that you never dismiss Unfinished tasks or Recurring tasks. This surprises me. Where then is the push to clear Unfinished tasks?>

This issue seems to highlight, to me at any rate, that ONLY tasks NEVER started can be dismissed, and that Mark is right to emphasise that being 'Unfinished' is the spur. However, sometimes one has to realise that one particular task/project is past its sell-by date and diminishing returns on effort may have set in.

If so, what stops one from dismissing an Unfinished Task? I cannot see any limitation, sometimes that's how life is.

Recurring tasks: by their very nature, each incidence of each task must be completed before it can be re-entered as a 'new' task, so I see no need for dismissal, unless again the usefulness of the task is past its sell-by date.

I think we are seeing the emergence of the (sometimes) subtle difference between a recurring task and an unfinished task. It's the latter that bugs me!
December 3, 2010 at 16:06 | Registered CommenterRoger J
<Actually the first step is to enter all tasks into New Tasks. They only get categorised once they have had some action taken on them. >

Thanks, Mark - of couse you're right. I'll let you know how I get on. I hope the excitement of having a new system to play with doesn't drown out the fact that the best way to get things done is to do them, as I think you pointed out a while back.
December 3, 2010 at 17:03 | Registered CommenterMargaret1
Alan:

<< Earlier you wrote that your new version of AF4 would be happier with larger-grained tasks than some other systems. Is that the case here? >>

Yes, I think that's right. I am for instance putting entire books into it as one task, e.g. "Read War and Peace", rather than "Read War and Peace, Chapter 1". That wouldn't work in 3-T because a task that large would occupy the slot for weeks (or, as when I actually read War and Peace, years).
December 3, 2010 at 17:15 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Roger J:

I distinguish between dismissing a task, which is the result of a rule-based system, and deleting a task. In all my systems one is always free to delete a task at any time. This system makes it easier to audit one's list and delete tasks accordingly.
December 3, 2010 at 17:19 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
There's a big article on Autofocus and this latest variant on the Life Hacker site today:

http://lifehacker.com/5704856/the-autofocus-productivity-method-stop-maintaining-to+do-lists-and-start-getting-stuff-done
December 3, 2010 at 17:42 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Great article! Moving from an electronic DWM AF4 system to an analog SAF one, I find this to be very true:

"I and many others found that working the list resulted in an almost meditative state in which resistance and procrastination seemed to melt away and the task of the moment became for that moment the focus of one's universe. "
December 3, 2010 at 17:53 | Registered CommenterVegheadjones
This sounds promising!

There's one thing in Mark's instructions that I found a bit confusing: Mark says to set up three pages in the notebook with the headings "New", "Recurring" and "Unfinished". The next instruction is to:

<<...write down about 10-20 tasks that you need to do, and draw a line under them. These are your initial "Old Tasks". As you think of other tasks or they arise in the course of your work, add them below the line. These are your "New Tasks".>>

But which page should this list of 10-20 tasks be placed on to? I'm guessing that it should be the "New" page, though it could just as easily be the next blank page in the notebook, or somewhere else. It'd be good to know exactly which page these tasks should go on...
December 3, 2010 at 18:16 | Registered CommenterKiwi Erik
Mark:
<<Now start working on the New Tasks >>
<<When you've done as much work as you want to do on New Tasks for the time being, deal with the "Recurring" page and then the "Unfinished" page in the same way >>

The New Tasks (those below the line): in the original AF4 they were worked on in order, ie by a single pass though the list before returning to the Old Tasks. Are the New Tasks still worked on in this way? Or are they worked on the circulating stand-out principle (ie continue going around them until none stand out)?

If its the latter, then it appears to be a variance to the original AF4 way of working. The Closed List gets worked on in a circulating fashion, the Open List gets worked on in a single pass fashion in the original AF4.
December 3, 2010 at 18:24 | Registered CommenterJD
I had to go back and reread the directions when I got to that point, too. I'm interpreting "in the same way" as meaning round and round until nothing stands out, only without the possibility of dismissal. ("Please note that only Old Tasks are liable to be dismissed. New Tasks, Recurring Tasks and Unfinished Tasks are not dismissed.")

Mark? What was your intent here?
December 3, 2010 at 20:12 | Registered CommenterSarah
Kiwi Erik:

<< But which page should this list of 10-20 tasks be placed on to? >>

Sorry this isn't as clear as it should be. They are new tasks so they should go on the New Tasks page - they are then immediately transformed into Old Tasks when the line is drawn. I've amended it to make it clear.
December 3, 2010 at 20:49 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
"I and many others found that working the list resulted in an almost meditative state in which resistance and procrastination seemed to melt away and the task of the moment became for that moment the focus of one's universe. "

Thanks for the clue. That totally clarifies where I'm going wrong today. I'm overcomplicating. Setting the above as my goal.
December 3, 2010 at 20:51 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
JD:

<< Are the New Tasks still worked on in this way? Or are they worked on the circulating stand-out principle (ie continue going around them until none stand out)? >>

This is a change to AF4. All the four types of task (Old, New, Recurring and Unfinished) are worked on the circulating stand-out principle.
December 3, 2010 at 20:53 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Sarah:

<< Mark? What was your intent here? >>

Because re-entered tasks are not put onto the "New" page, the number of New Tasks is vastly reduced from AF4. This changes the dynamics between the closed list and the open list, so it makes more sense to treat all four types of task (Old, New, Recurring, Unfinished) the same.
December 3, 2010 at 21:02 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Makes sense, thanks for clarifying! That's definitely what I'm seeing... I dumped my whole existing list as "old" (I know, I know...) so it started at 40ish tasks... and right now at the end of one full working day I've got 23 Old, 6 New, 4 Recurring, and 5 Unfinished.
December 3, 2010 at 21:29 | Registered CommenterSarah
I found the same results (preponderance of recurring tasks, relatively small number of actually new tasks) when I broke up my DWM list into six categories:

Work Hotlist
Work Maintenance
Work Misc

Personal Hotlist
Personal Maintenance
Personal Misc

The Hotlists roughly equate to the Unfinished -- current key work that I'm trying to finish.

The Maintenance lists equate to the Recurring.

The Misc lists roughly equate to the New. What I've found is that I actually look at these lists very rarely.

New items that I initially add to the Misc lists, but then actually turn out to be really important, I just move them to the Hotlists.


I still keep those lists in Outlook, but I've been "driving" the whole system with a little SuperFocus notebook. It prompts me to go check the different lists. Often I just write hot tasks directly into SuperFocus.

Personally, I'd really be cautious about moving to this new AF4 revision, because it seems to lack the control of the SuperFocus 2nd column feature. And my DWM backend system in Outlook works very similarly to the new AF4 revision already.
December 3, 2010 at 21:34 | Registered CommenterSeraphim
Mark, any thoughts of integrating the SuperFocus 2nd column feature into AF4 revised?

Or, going the other direction, any thoughts of perhaps integrating the different page types into SuperFocus? Seems like that would be pretty simple, actually. You could just use the AF dismissal rules, rather than AF4 dismissal rules, and thus have only three types of tasks, New (never touched), Recurring, and Unfinished.

Or any thoughts in general on how AF4 Revised compares with SuperFocus?
December 3, 2010 at 21:35 | Registered CommenterSeraphim
What happens when the New page is full? When the recurring or unfinished pages get full? Seems to me in a notebook you start to get a mix of pages like new/recurring/new/unfinished/unfinished/recurring. Will processing get awkward or do you mostly take it one page at a time?
December 3, 2010 at 22:01 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
Seraphim:

Lots to think about in your posts - and, no, I haven't thought about any of it yet!
December 4, 2010 at 0:36 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Alan:

Yes, you do get a mix of pages. My currently active pages are new/recurring/unfinished/new/new/recurring/recurring.

It sounds confusing, but in practice I don't find it so. If I'm working on New for example, when I get to the end of one New page I just page forward until I come to the next. It helps if the pages are clearly marked of course.

Another solution, as Roger J proposed earlier, is to use a loose-leaf notebook.
December 4, 2010 at 0:41 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Sarah:

<< I've got 23 Old, 6 New, 4 Recurring, and 5 Unfinished. >>

At the end of today I have 9 Old, 6 New, 32 Recurring and 3 Unfinished. I can see from those figures immediately that I have far too many recurring tasks, and if I cut them right back I would finish all my work in no time at all!
December 4, 2010 at 0:48 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Any system really benefits from a separation between New/Old/Unfinished (Projects) with Recurring (Maintenance). When a project is finished, it often creates roots that need to be tended to (maintenance) without our being conscious of it. Any way of actually figuring out the numbers and forcibly limit them is a boon to one's time.
December 4, 2010 at 6:45 | Registered CommenterErik
Mark wrote:
<At the end of today I have 9 Old, 6 New, 32 Recurring and 3 Unfinished. I can see from those figures immediately that I have far too many recurring tasks, and if I cut them right back I would finish all my work in no time at all!>

Mark, I'd be interested to know what your recurring tasks consist of. Most of mine are things that I feel I wouldn't want to, or be able to, cut back on, such as laundry, housework, check e-mail, do paperwork, phone family and friends, meals+clear.
December 4, 2010 at 11:30 | Registered CommenterMargaret1
Margaret1:

The point I was making was that the figures enable me to see where I can make improvements in my personal time management. Your figures may show something entirely different. If I were to cut back my recurring tasks, I certainly wouldn't be cutting the ones you mention (though it might be worth looking to see if there are ways of cutting down the time they take - email for instance often takes much more time than it needs to).
December 4, 2010 at 12:08 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
This must be one of the 'fastest' new threads in the Forum!

<<Mark wrote:
<At the end of today I have 9 Old, 6 New, 32 Recurring and 3 Unfinished. I can see from those figures immediately that I have far too many recurring tasks, and if I cut them right back I would finish all my work in no time at all!>>

<Mark, I'd be interested to know what your recurring tasks consist of. Most of mine are things that I feel I wouldn't want to, or be able to, cut back on, such as laundry, housework, check e-mail, do paperwork, phone family and friends, meals+clear.>

I do not think 32 x Recurring is too many, much of everyday stuff is little tasks. Margaret's post has six in a one line example.

The key, I think, and Seraphim and others have mentioned this, is to find a way of batching and/or processing such Recurring tasks. Wasn't it nuntym who several weeks ago brought in the concept of these tasks as being of a maintenance type and need to be processed in a certain way for efficiency's sake?

One problem is that consolidating such tasks under one or a few headings leads to the danger of some individual tasks not being done. I've got a personality, and now a matching ag,e that lends itself to forgetting things, which is one reason I've coped better since AF arrived nearly two years ago.

I combat this deficiency of my own with extensive checklists, especially for work travel where arriving at a foreign destination with something missing can be a right burden. Not having a spare power unit for my notebook computer is not a problem in Durban or Damascus, but it is in Solwezi or Mkuu-Rombo.

I've been tackling these 'maintenance' recurring tasks by entering each relevant one into lists called:

- First thing morning: eg turn heating system on, check overnight email, schedule for the day,AF/DWM list, take garbage downstairs when leaving, medication.
- Work stuff: these are items to be packed into my work bag (backpack or briefcase) or to carry/have about my person.
- Mid-Morning: Check email (I turn off automatic sending/receiving to minimise distractions), reviewAF/DWM, make/return calls or messages.
- Break: as above plus a snack and soup.
- Afternoon: as above, plus check errands to do en route back to apartment (all errand items are written in a Moleskine pocket notebook which I always carry with me everywhere, and which serves a capture point if my AF/DWM book isn't with me).
- Arrival apartment: set up computer notebook on desk, review AF/DWM, reduce Inbox to zero, go through new entries in Moleskine pocket book, save new passwords, incremental backup etc.

I also have a Weekly and a Monthly Maintenance list with additional tasks to the daily stuff, such as a weekly full backup, review medication stock, monthly battery swap/recharge, clean IT kit etc.

These maintenance tasks are all in a ListPro file which is available on my smartphone (WM 6.5, no iPhone for me, yet). I am able to tick off the applicable ones, then clear the tick boxes for the next day when I'm done.

And yes, sometimes I might forget to use the list, so I may still enter a forgotten task into my AF/DWM list. Some days a task item might not be applicable, but it's still on the list if does need to be ticked, eg green box medication ok?

Works for me.
December 4, 2010 at 12:11 | Registered CommenterRoger J
Roger:

Whether 32 Recurring Tasks is too many or not depends on your circumstances. I know I could cut down the number considerably in my life, but of course that may be quite different for other people.

I think checklists are a great idea, particularly in the sort of circumstances you mention. For years I was out giving presentations to church groups every night of the week, and I always used a check list to make sure I hadn't forgotten anything.

I note that the checklists you mention are for particular times, such as first thing in the morning, packing for work, and so on. I don't recommend that tasks which have to be done at a particular time should be on an Autofocus list. AF is for managing unscheduled tasks.
December 4, 2010 at 12:24 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
Mark,

Oops, I forgot to mention that the maintenance tasks referred to in my previous posting do not appear anywhere in my AF/DWM list. They reside in Listpro and are triggered by an Outlook alarm at the appropriate time. I use Outlook for hard schedule appointments and regular recurring tasks.

I just have to have these checklists because although I've tried to make them habits, sometimes I forget the basic stuff when I leave the apartment or office, eg passport (advisable to carry it here in Damascus, or at least a colour copy of the main page and current visa - note to self: scan passport, print copies, carry in wallet/work bag), even my watch or phone now and again.

Of course, little reminders not in Listpro DO appear on AF/DWM, eg "Put new camera in work bag before end of day".

BTW, you need to correct that 'Columns' error in the Lifehacker copy as well, just in case.
December 4, 2010 at 14:40 | Registered CommenterRoger J
Roger J:

<< you need to correct that 'Columns' error in the Lifehacker copy as well, just in case. >>

I can ask them to correct it - but I've no control over whether they do or not.
December 4, 2010 at 16:23 | Registered CommenterMark Forster
I like reducing things to their essence, and in this case it seems to be:
Focus over three lists:
- things you might do, divided into new and old
- things you started doing
- things you do regularly
December 4, 2010 at 17:22 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu
Alan:

Thanks for that neat appraisal, makes a lot of sense.

Out of interest, will you be revamping your OneNote system for work? I can see re-jigging within OneNote is so easy.

I still prefer to keep work and non-work lists separate, however, it may be feasible for some to have two columns on each page, one for Work, the other for Personal, but still subject to the AF4R rules. Another approach could be Personal on LH pages, Work on RH pages.

I would also try to keep the New/Old Tasks, Unfinished/in progress, and Recurring is separate parts of any paper system as well.
December 5, 2010 at 10:59 | Registered CommenterRoger J
Haha, just figured I REALLY prefer this kind of categorizing to GTD contexts!!!
December 5, 2010 at 13:57 | Registered CommenterErik
Hi Erik,

I know what you mean!

To be fair, it was GTD that got me interested again in task management, but I just could not handle the system/concept 'overhead'.

That said, I do sometimes use contexts to decide where and when I can do certain tasks.

The best example occurred last year when I was working in rural Zambia for a month and the broadband access via the mobile phone network was awful. This meant I could not file my UK VAT (sales/purchase tax) quarterly return online until I was in Johannesburg airport en route home where the access was great and I could catch up plus do a lot of email processing.

That was back in the early days of AutoFocus and I recall tagging some tasks 'JNB' = Johannesburg International Airport code.
December 5, 2010 at 16:59 | Registered CommenterRoger J
Mark - are the old/new lists roughly equivalent to the Backlog/Active lists from the original AF4 instructions?
December 5, 2010 at 23:28 | Registered CommenterLillian
Lillian: yes but much shorter. Expect much faster dismissal of the closed list because things never :move: into the open list but rather the other two lists.

Roger: The newest system will work exceptionally well in OneNote, yes. Based on it's similarities to My System, I expect it to be a major step up from AF4 in effectiveness. I would consider following it but I'm currently experimenting with a SuperFocus-based project system.

If you were doing OneNote also for home, create a second notebook.
December 6, 2010 at 1:44 | Registered CommenterAlan Baljeu